Sep 2021 - Summer School

Summer School, Entrepreneurial Event and Workshop

Photo

location_on Heraklion

Overview

Τhe event will last 6 days and will include the following:

  • Summer school on “Edge computing and Blockchain” 
  • Workshop on  “Security, Privacy and Trust for Wearable Devices” 
  • Entrepreneurship event 101


Dates: 5th September - 10th September 2021 

Lead Institution: FORTH

Location: Heraklion

Zoom Link: https://zoom.us/j/94063872557?pwd=bEFJUWp3eGFZTFVJcHlQZWJzZndVZz09


If you are planning to attend the event either in physical presence or remotely, please register at:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/summer-school-entrepreneurial-event-and-workshop-tickets-163840582593


  • For information regarding the accommodation click here.
  • For travel information click here.


Agenda

Time Sunday 9/5 Monday 9/6 Tuesday 9/7 Wednesday 9/8 Thursday 9/9 Friday 9/10
8:00-9:00 Arrival Breakfast [8:15-8:45]
Mini Breakfast Session: Entrepreneurship 101
Breakfast [8:15-8:45]
Mini Breakfast Session: Entrepreneurship 101
Breakfast
9:00-10:00 Chair: Sarunas Girdzijauskas

Keynote 1: 'An introduction to blockchain and cryptocurrencies' by Bart Preneel
Chair: Evangelos Markatos

Keynote 2: 'I lost my blockchain private key, now what?' by Costas Chalkias
Chair: George Pallis

Keynote 3: 'Edge Intelligence – Engineering the New Fabric of IoT, Edge, and Cloud' by Schahram Dustdar
Chair: Marios Dikaiakos

Keynote 4: 'State of Permissionless and Permissioned Blockchains: Myths and Reality' by C. Mohan
Chair: Evangelos Markatos

Keynote 5: 'Rethinking Information Technology Services as Incentive Driven Collaborative Systems' by Aggelos Kiayias
10:00-10:30 Break Break Break Break Break
10:30 - 12:30 Chair: Athena Vakali

'Demystifying Fog Computing: Large-Scale and Repeatable Experimentation via Emulation' by Demetris Trihinas
Chair: George Pallis

'Demystifying Blockchains: An Algorithmic Approach' by Spyros Voulgaris
Chair: George Pallis

'Demystifying Blockchains: An Algorithmic Approach' by Spyros Voulgaris
I&E Session 4: 'The entrepreneurial journey' session by Tobias Vahlne Chair: Sarunas Girdzijauskas

10.30/11.30: WST5 - 'Automated cybersecurity for Internet-connected Things' by Shahid Raza
Chair: Sarunas Girdzijauskas

11.30/12.30: WST6 - 'Sense & Sensibility in Sports: Personal & Interdependent Wearables that Work' by Arthur van der Wees
12:30-14:00 Lunch Lunch Lunch 12:00 13:00 Lunch Lunch
14:00 - 15:00 14.00/14.05: Ahmed Ahmed
Chair: George Pallis

'Demystifying Fog Computing: Large-Scale and Repeatable Experimentation via Emulation' by Demetris Trihinas
΄3D Analytics for Human Motion Data' by Maarten Gijssel
Chair: Elena Ferrari

13.00/14.00: WST1 - 'Security of 4G and 5G cellular networks' by Elisa Bertino
Free Time
14.05/14.10: 'Machine Learning on Decentralized Networks' by Lodovico Giaretta
14.10/14.15: Andrei Kazlouski
14.15/14.20: 'Map embeddings in a deep neural network for out-of-distribution detection' by Vangjush Komini
14.20/14.25: 'Securing IoT Devices Against Malware' by Ahmed Lekssays
14.25/14.30: Thomas Marchioro
14.30/14.35: Susanna Pozzoli
14.35/14.40: 'Confidence Calibrated Human Activity Recognition' by Debaditya Roy
Chair: Elena Ferrari

14.00/15.00: WST2 - 'Safeguarding against Information Exposure From Consumer IoT Devices' by Hamed Haddadi
14.40/14.45: 'Risk Management for Android Apps' by Ha Xuan Son
14.45/14.50: Sofia Yfantidou
14.50/14.55: Michalis Kasioulis
15:00 - 15:30 Break Break Break Break Break
15:30 - 17:00 I&E Session 1: 'Define your Concept' session by Tobias Vahlne 15.30/16.30: Fellow Poster Session I&E Session 3: 'Understand your customer' session by Tobias Vahlne Chair: Barbara Carminati

15.30/16.30: WST3 - 'Characterizing abhorrent misinformative and mistargeted content on YouTube' by Michael Sirivianos
Free Time
16.30/17.30: I&E Session 2: 'How to pitch your idea' session by Tobias Vahlne
Chair: Barbara Carminati

16.30/17.30: WST4 - 'Side and Covert Channels: the Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde of Modern Technologies' by Mauro Conti
17:00 - 18:00 Hands-on Hands-on Hands-on

19:00-19:45 Welcome and Intro to IE



20:00 - 22:00 Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner Dinner


Edge Computing and Blockchain

Keynote 1 - Bart Preneel

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Bart Preneel COSIC, KU Leuven, and Imec An introduction to blockchain and cryptocurrencies

Abstract
This lecture will offer a perspective on the building blocks and concepts of blockchain technologies. We will explain the background of distributed consensus, timestamping and secure logging. Next, we will discuss the fast rise of cryptocurrencies based on proof of work, with Bitcoin as most prominent example. In about a decade, a white paper of nine pages has resulted in massive capital investments, a global ecosystem with a market capitalization of several hundreds of billions of dollars and the redefinition of the term crypto (which now means cryptocurrencies). Next, we explain how several variants attempt to improve the complex tradeoffs between public verifiability, robustness, privacy and performance. We conclude with an analysis of blockchain-based business models and a discussion of open problems.
Bio
Bart Preneel is a full professor at the KU Leuven, where he heads the imec-COSIC research group, that has 100 members. He has authored numerous scientific publications and is inventor of five patents. His research interests are cryptography, cybersecurity and privacy. He is president of LSEC and has been president of the IACR (International Association for Cryptologic Research). He has been invited speaker at more than 120 conferences in more than 40 countries. He has received the RSA award for Excellence in the Field of Mathematics (2014), the Kristian Beckman Award from IFIP TC11 (2015) and the ESORICS Research Excellence Award (2017). He is a fellow of the IACR and a member of the Academia Europaea and ENISA’s Advisory Group. He frequently consults for the technology and financial sectors and is involved with several start-ups in the area of cybersecurity.

Keynote 2 - Kostas Chalkias

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Kostas Chalkias Senior Staff Cryptographer at Facebook Title: I lost my blockchain private key, now what?
Remote
Abstract
One of the main criticisms over the usability of blockchain wallets is that of generating and protecting your private keys. A side-effect of poor key-management is losing access to the signing key, without necessarily this being compromised. That can happen for various reasons, the most common being accidentally deleting a key or forgetting a passphrase that make secret keys unrecoverable. Numerous real-world cases of losing fortunes have been reported, including a $350,000,000 worth of Bitcoins story where a one disposed of the hard disk while clearing out his house in 2013. We will present several different ways to protect against accidental key loss and describe the state-of-the-art KELP protocol: the first reactive solution to this problem that surprisingly works even in the absence of a backup mechanism to recover a lost private key.
Bio
Kostas holds a PhD in identity-based encryption and is a Senior Staff Cryptographer at Facebook with expertise in applied and theoretical cryptography. He is the main contributor to both Diem blockchain and Facebook's Novi Wallet cryptography apis and lead maintainer of the proof-of-reserves community standard for cryptocurrency exchanges. He also drives Facebook's blockchain research on cryptographic and privacy preserving algorithms including zero knowledge proofs, signature aggregation, efficient accumulators, post-quantum signatures and atomic swaps. He was previously the lead cryptographer at R3 London, one of the biggest fintech consortia, with significant contributions to both "Corda" blockchain and the SGX-based "Conclave" confidential compute engine. Prior to that, he was the CTO of two startups, where he built a platform for fair and secure national exams and quizzes using time-lapse cryptography. Kostas has also filed numerous cryptography patents, while he has implemented and found critical bugs in several international standards and blockchain protocols, including the EdDSA signature scheme, financial solvency protocols, graphical passwords, base64 encoding and lottery smart contracts.

Keynote 3 - Schahram Dustdar

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Schahram Dustdar
Head of the Research Division of Distributed Systems at the TU Wien, Austria
Edge Intelligence – Engineering the New Fabric of IoT, Edge, and Cloud


Abstract
As humans, things, software and AI continue to become the entangled fabric of distributed systems, systems engineers and researchers are facing novel challenges. In this talk, we analyze the role of IoT, Edge, Cloud, and Human-based Computing as well as AI in the co-evolution of distributed systems for the new decade. We identify challenges and discuss a roadmap that these new distributed systems have to address. We take a closer look at how a cyber-physical fabric will be complemented by AI operationalization to enable seamless end-to-end distributed systems.
Bio
Schahram Dustdar is Full Professor of Computer Science heading the Research Division of Distributed Systems at the TU Wien, Austria. He holds several honorary positions: University of California (USC) Los Angeles; Monash University in Melbourne, Shanghai University, Macquarie University in Sydney, University Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. From Dec 2016 until Jan 2017 he was a Visiting Professor at the University of Sevilla, Spain and from January until June 2017 he was a Visiting Professor at UC Berkeley, USA. From 1999 – 2007. He worked as the co-founder and chief scientist of Caramba Labs Software AG in Vienna (acquired by Engineering NetWorld AG), a venture capital co-funded software company focused on software for collaborative processes in teams. Caramba Labs was nominated for several (international and national) awards: World Technology Award in the category of Software (2001); Top-Startup companies in Austria (CapGemini Ernst & Young) (2002); MERCUR Innovation award of the Austrian Chamber of Commerce (2002). He is co-founder and chief-scientist of sinoaus.net, based in Nanajing, an R&D organization focused on IoT and Edge Intelligence. He is founding co-Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Internet of Things (ACM TIoT) as well as Editor-in-Chief of Computing (Springer). He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Services Computing, IEEE Transactions on Cloud Computing, ACM Computing Surveys, ACM Transactions on the Web, and ACM Transactions on Internet Technology, as well as on the editorial board of IEEE Internet Computing and IEEE Computer. Dustdar is recipient of multiple awards: IEEE TCSVC Outstanding Leadership Award (2018), IEEE TCSC Award for Excellence in Scalable Computing (2019), ACM Distinguished Scientist (2009), ACM Distinguished Speaker (2021), IBM Faculty Award (2012). He is an elected member of the Academia Europaea: The Academy of Europe, where he is chairman of the Informatics Section, as well as an IEEE Fellow (2016) and an Asia-Pacific Artificial Intelligence Association (AAIA) Fellow (2021).

Keynote 4 - C. Mohan

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
C. Mohan Distinguished Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University in China, Microsoft's Data Team Consultant, and Kerala Blockchain Academy (KBA) and Tamil Nadu e-Governance Agency (TNeGA) Advisor. State of Permissionless and Permissioned Blockchains: Myths and Reality

Abstract
Since the concept of blockchain was invented as the underlying core data structure of the permissionless/public Bitcoin cryptocurrency network, several cryptocurrencies, and associated concepts like tokens and ICOs emerged. After much speculation and hype, significant number of them have become problematic or worthless, even though some countries have embraced them! The public blockchain system Ethereum emerged by generalizing the use of blockchains to manage any kind of asset, be it physical or purely digital, with the introduction of the concept of Smart Contracts. Over the years, numerous myths have developed with respect tothe purported utility and the need for permissionless blockchains. The adoption and further adaptation of blockchains and smart contracts for use in the permissioned/private environments is what I consider to be useful and of practical consequence. Hence, only private blockchain systems will be the focus of my talk. IT companies like IBM, Intel, SAP, Huawei, Oracle, Baidu and AWS, and many key players in different vertical industry segments (e.g., Ant Financial) have recognized the applicability of blockchains in environments other than cryptocurrencies. There is a great deal of momentum behind Hyperledger Fabric throughout the world. Other private blockchain systems include Quorum, Hyperledger Sawtooth and R3 Corda. In this talk, I will describe some use-case scenarios, especially those in production deployment. I will also survey the landscape of private blockchain systems with respect to their architectures in general and their approaches to some specific technical areas. Along the way, I will bust many myths associated with permissionless blockchains. I will also compare traditional database technologies with blockchain systems’ features and identify desirable future research topics. This is a highly revised version of a keynote delivered at ACM SIGMOD International Conference on Management of Data in Amsterdam in July 2019. The associated keynote paper is at http://bit.ly/sigBcP
Bio
Dr. C. Mohan is currentlya Distinguished Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University in China, a Consultant to Microsoft's Data Team, and an Advisor of the Kerala Blockchain Academy (KBA) and the Tamil Nadu e-Governance Agency (TNeGA) in India. He retired in June2020 from being an IBM Fellow at the IBM Almaden Research Center in Silicon Valley. He was an IBM researcher for 38.5 years in the database, blockchain, AIand related areas, impacting numerous IBM and non-IBM products, the research and academic communities, and standards, especially with his invention of the well-known ARIES family of database locking and recovery algorithms, and the Presumed Abort distributed commit protocol. This IBM (1997-2020), ACM (2002) and IEEE (2002) Fellow has also served as the IBM India Chief Scientist (2006-2009). In addition to receiving the ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award (1996), the VLDB 10 Year Best Paper Award (1999) and numerous IBM awards, Mohan was elected to the US and Indian National Academies of Engineering (2009) and named an IBM Master Inventor (1997). This Distinguished Alumnus of IIT Madras (1977) received his PhD at the University of Texas at Austin (1981). He is an inventor of 50 patents. During the last many years, he focused on Blockchain, AI, Big Data and HTAP technologies (http://bit.ly/sigBcP,http://bit.ly/CMgMDS). Since 2017, he has been an evangelist of permissioned blockchains and the myth buster of permissionless blockchains. During 1H2021, Mohan was the Shaw Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore where he taught a seminar course on distributed data and computing. In late 2019, he became an Honorary Advisor to TNeGA for its blockchain and other projects. In August 2020, he joined the Advisory Board of KBA of India. Since 2016, Mohan has been a Distinguished Visiting Professor of China’s prestigious Tsinghua University. Hehas served on the advisory board of IEEE Spectrum, and on numerous conference and journal boards. Mohan is a frequent speaker in North America, Europe and Asia. He has given talks in 43 countries. He is highly active on social media and has a huge network of followers. More information can be found in the Wikipedia page at http://bit.ly/CMwIkP and his resume at http://bit.ly/CMoNUS.

Keynote 5 - Aggelos Kiayias

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Aggelos Kiayias
Chair in Cyber Security and Privacy and director of the Blockchain Technology Laboratory at the University of Edinburgh
Rethinking Information Technology Services as Incentive Driven Collaborative Systems


Abstract
With the introduction of Bitcoin and blockchain technology, we also witnessed the first example of an information technology service deployed via open and incentive driven collaboration. Viewed in this light, the service emerges out of the self-interest of computer node operators that enroll themselves to support the system’s operation in exchange of rewards that are provided in the system’s digital currency. In this talk, I will flesh out this approach as a novel paradigm for deploying general purpose information technology services and discuss design challenges and use-cases beyond financial technology, such as anonymous communications and supply chain management.
Bio
Prof. Aggelos Kiayias FRSE is chair in Cyber Security and Privacy and director of the Blockchain Technology Laboratory at the University of Edinburgh. He is also the Chief Scientist at blockchain technology company IOHK and Associate Professor of Cryptography and Security at the University of Athens. His research interests are in computer security, information security, applied cryptography and foundations of cryptography with a particular emphasis in blockchain technologies and distributed systems, e-voting and secure multiparty protocols as well as privacy and identity management. He has received an ERC Starting Grant, a Marie Curie fellowship, an NSF Career Award, and a Fulbright Fellowship. He holds a Ph.D. from the City University of New York and he is a graduate of the Mathematics department of the University of Athens. He has over 150 publications in journals and conference proceedings in the area. He has served as the program chair of the Cryptographers’ Track of the RSA conference in 2011 and the Financial Cryptography and Data Security conference in 2017, as well as the general chair of Eurocrypt 2013. He also served as the program chair of Real World Crypto Symposium 2020 and the Public-Key Cryptography Conference 2020. He is in the editorial boards of ACM Transactions on Privacy and Security and IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing as well as in the advisory board of Cryptoeconomic Systems. In 2021 he was elected fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

Demetris Trihinas

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Demetris Trihinas
Lecturer at the Department of Computer Science, University of Nicosia and a Senior Member at the University’s Artificial Intelligence Lab
Demystifying Fog Computing: Large-Scale and Repeatable Experimentation via Emulation


Abstract
Fog Computing is emerging as the dominating paradigm bridging the compute and connectivity gap between sensing devices and latency-sensitive IoT services. However, experimenting and evaluating IoT services is a daunting task involving the manual configuration and deployment of a mixture of geo-distributed physical and virtual infrastructure with different resource and network requirements. This results in sub-optimal, costly and error-prone deployments due to numerous unexpected overheads not initially envisioned in the design phase and underwhelming testing conditions not resembling the end environment. This seminar series will survey the challenges involved with developing and testing IoT services operating in the “fog”. During the first day, we will introduce Fogify, an open-source emulation suite developed to ease the design of large-scale fog testbeds that can be deployed on the developer’s laptop or a computing cluster and subsequently be used to rapidly define reproducible experiments and “what-if” scenarios. During the second day, we will introduce an end-to-end tutorial of how to design emulated fog testbeds and perform application profiling and “chaos” testing by deploying a proof-of-concept intelligent transportation service.
Bio
Dr. Demetris Trihinas is a Lecturer at the Department of Computer Science, University of Nicosia and a Senior Member at the University’s Artificial Intelligence Lab. He holds a PhD in Computer Science from the Univ.of Cyprus and a Dipl.-Ing. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the National Technical Univ. of Athens. His research interests include Data-Intensive Computing with particular focus in Geo-Distributed Big Data Management and Data Mining over Cloud, IoT and Edge Computing topologies. His work is published in IEEE/ACM journals and conferences such as TCC, TSC, Internet Computing, INFOCOM, BigData and CCGrid. Demetris is currently the Project Coordinator of the FlockAI project. FlockAI aims to deliver a framework capable of enabling Machine Learning and its applications to drone technology for handling time-critical missions. Demetris is also contributing as a Work Package Leader (Data Management for Fog Services) to the RAINBOW H2020 EU co-funded project that aims to develop an open and trusted fog computing platform that facilitates the deployment of scalable and heterogeneous IoT services.

Spyros Voulgaris

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Spyros Voulgaris
Assistant Professor at the Department of Informatics of the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB)
Demystifying Blockchains: An Algorithmic Approach


Abstract
This lecture will offer a thorough yet intuitive look at the key mechanisms governing blockchain operation. It will help attendees grasp the essence of blockchain operation and develop a solid comprehension and strong intuition of the principles behind this technology. The focus will be on the incentives, motives, and reasoning that led to the design of these algorithms, as well as on their interplay and trade-offs. The lecture will illustrate the inner workings of the most prominent consensus mechanisms, including Proof-of-Work and Proof-of-Stake, shedding light at their respective design decisions. Further, we will look into application-level algorithms for blockchains, notably those that enable Interledger Communication. Finally, we will discuss current application trends as well as new research challenges.
Bio
Spyros Voulgaris is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Informatics of the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB) since 2018. Prior to that, he was a tenured Assistant Professor in Computer Science at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. He obtained his MSc from the University of Michigan and his PhD from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (2006), after which he served as a senior researcher at ETH Zurich, Switzerland (2006 to 2008). He has also paid a number of research visits, including Microsoft Research Cambridge, INRIA Rennes, the University of Bologna, and the University of Patras, while he has worked for HP Labs in Palo Alto, California, and for Hughes Network Systems, in Germantown, Maryland. His research interests include distributed ledger technology, Internet-scale distributed systems, publish/subscribe protocols, Big Data infrastructures, information dissemination, peer-to-peer and epidemic algorithms, large-scale self-organization, mobile ad-hoc networks, and sensor networks. His publications have attracted over 3000 citations, shaping his h-index to 22.

Maarten Gijssel

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Maarten Gijssel
Founder of Kinetic Analysis BV and an entrepreneur in the sports and health tech domain
3D Analytics for Human Motion Data


Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) representations of the physical world are now available at a large scale, due to progress in sensor technologies. Leveraging such 3D representations with analytics has the potential to advance science and in areas like sports- and health tech. Although sensor technologies are already available for decades, this novel data type has by far reached it’s potential. Kinetic Analysis addresses this gap, we first explain how 3D analytics generates benefits for sports analytics and how to process 3D data to add value to the trainers, coaches and players.
Bio

Maarten Gijssel is the founder of Kinetic Analysis BV and an entrepreneur in the sports and health tech domain. He creates impact and opportunities with human movement data. After working as a physiotherapist, he specialized in motion data. In addition to his work in clinical practice, he worked for more than 10 years as a lecturer for healthcare professionals and engineers in the health domain. With a special focus on biomechanics and exercise physiology, his team is creating new wearable devices such as smart textiles and smart patches.

Security Workshop

WST1 - Elisa Bertino

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Elisa Bertino Purdue Universityn Security of 4G and 5G cellular networks bertino@cs.purdue.edu Remote
Abstract
As the world moves to 4G and 5G cellular networks, security and privacy are paramount importance and new tools are needed to ensure them. For example, LTEInspector is a model-based testing approach that combines a symbolic model checker and a cryptographic protocol verifier in the symbolic attacker model. Using it, researchers have uncovered 10 new attacks along with 9 prior attacks, categorized into three abstract classes (i.e., security, user privacy, and disruption of service), in three procedures of 4G LTE. Notable among the findings is the authentication relay attack that enables an adversary to spoof the location of a legitimate user to the core network without possessing appropriate credentials. To ensure that the exposed attacks pose real threats and are indeed realizable in practice, 8 of the 10 new attacks have been validated and their accompanying adversarial assumptions have been put through a real testbed. On-going work in addressing some of those vulnerabilities points the way toward an agenda of further research.
Bio
Elisa Bertino is professor of Computer Science at Purdue University. She serves as Director of the Purdue Cyberspace Security Lab (Cyber2Slab). Prior to joining Purdue, she was a professor and department head at the Department of Computer Science and Communication of the University of Milan. She has been a visiting researcher at the IBM Research Laboratory in San Jose (now Almaden), at the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation, at Rutgers University, at Telcordia Technologies. She has also held visiting professor positions at the Singapore National University and the Singapore Management University. Her main research interests include security, privacy, database systems, distributed systems, and sensor networks. Her recent research focuses on cybersecurity and privacy of cellular networks and IoT systems, and on edge analytics for cybersecurity. Elisa Bertino is a Fellow member of IEEE, ACM, and AAAS. She received the 2002 IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award for “For outstanding contributions to database systems and database security and advanced data management systems”, the 2005 IEEE Computer Society Tsutomu Kanai Award for “Pioneering and innovative research contributions to secure distributed systems”, and the 2019-2020 ACM Athena Lecturer Award.

WST2 - Hamed Haddadi

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Hamed Haddadi Imperial College, London Safeguarding against Information Exposure From Consumer IoT Devices h.haddadi@imperial.ac.uk In presence
Abstract
Consumer Internet of Things devices often come with a range of sensors and actuators, require access to a variety of personal data sources and continuous internet connectivity, and are equipped with a variety of embedded pre-trained Machine Learning (ML) models. In this talk, I will present our recent findings on privacy threats from these devices and potential mitigation strategies using selective blocking of device activities and destinations. I will then discuss the ways in which we can leverage novel architectures to provide private, trusted, personalised, and dynamically-configurable models on consumer devices to cater for heterogeneous environments and user requirements.
Bio
Hamed is a Reader in Human-Centred Systems and the Director of Postgraduate Studies at the Dyson School of Design Engineering at Imperial College London. He leads the Systems and Algorithms Laboratory and serves as a Security Science Fellow of the Institute for Security Science and Technology. He is also a Visiting Professor at Brave Software where he works on developing privacy-preserving analytics protocols.

WST3 - Michael Sirivianos

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Michael Sirivianos University of Cyprus Characterizing abhorrent misinformative and mistargeted content on YouTube michael.sirivianos@cut.ac.cy In presence
Abstract
YouTube has revolutionized the way people discover and consume video content. Although YouTube facilitates easy access to hundreds of well-produced educational, entertaining, and trustworthy news videos, mistargeted, misinformative, and abhorrent content is also common. The platform is plagued by various types of inappropriate content including: 1) disturbing videos targeting young children; 2) hateful and misogynistic content; and 3) pseudoscientific and conspiratorial content. While YouTube’s recommendation algorithm plays a vital role in increasing user engagement and YouTube’s monetization, its role in unwittingly promoting problematic content is not entirely understood. In this presentation, I will shed some light on the degree of abhorrent, misinformative, and mistargeted content on YouTube and the role of the recommendation algorithm in the discovery and dissemination of such content. Following a data-driven quantitative approach, we analyze thousands of videos posted on YouTube. Specifically, we devise various methodologies to detect problematic content, and we use them to simulate the behavior of users casually browsing YouTube to uncover: 1) the risks of YouTube media consumption by young children; 2) the role of YouTube’s recommendation algorithm in the dissemination of hateful and misogynistic content, by focusing on the Involuntary Celibates (Incels) community; and 3) user exposure to pseudoscientific misinformation on various parts of the platform and how this exposure changes based on the user’s watch history. In a nutshell, our analysis reveals that young children are likely to encounter disturbing content when they randomly browse the platform starting from benign videos relevant to their interests and that YouTube’s currently deployed counter-measures are ineffective in terms of detecting them in a timely manner. By analyzing the Incel community on YouTube, we find that not only Incel activity is increasing over time, but platforms may also play an active role in steering users towards extreme content. Finally, when studying pseudoscientific misinformation, we find among other things that YouTube suggests more pseudoscientific content regarding traditional pseudoscientific topics (e.g., flat earth) than for emerging ones (like COVID-19), and that these recommendations are more common on the search results page than on a user’s homepage or the video recommendations (up-next) section.
Bio
Michael is an Assistant Professor of Computer Engineering and Informatics. He holds a PhD from Duke University since 2010. His research interests include trust-aware design of distributed systems, device-centric authentication, federated identity management, discrimination based on personal data, cybersafety (cyberbullying detection, cybergrooming detection, characterization and detection of hate speech, detection of inappropriate videos targeting young children, and characterization and suppression of false information), transactional workload scalability, measurement of blockchain systems.He has published articles in the most influential conferences and journals of Networked Systems, including ACM SIGCOMM, USENIX NSDI, ACM IMC, USENIX ATC, AAAI ICWSM, IEEE INFOCOM, IEEE ICDCS, IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, and ACM Transactions on the Web. He has extensive experience leading EU-funded projects. Specifically, he was the technical manager of the ReCRED project (Horizon 2020 Innovation Action - 2014) and the coordinator of the ENCASE project (Horizon 2020 Marie Curie RISE - 2015). He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Research Centre of Excellence on Interactive media, Smart systems, and Emerging Technologies (RISE). His work on fringe web communities, hate speech, disinformation, and disturbing content on YouTube had extensive coverage in major news outlets, including The New York Times, Washington Post, The Atlantic, New Scientist, Business Insider, Quartz, Wired, and El Pais.

WST4 - Mauro Conti

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Mauro Conti University of Padova Side and Covert Channels: the Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde of Modern Technologies mauro.conti@unipd.it Remote
Abstract
While Smartphone and IoT devices usage become more and more pervasive, people start also asking to which extent such devices can be maliciously exploited as “tracking devices”. The concern is not only related to an adversary taking physical or remote control of the device, but also to what a passive adversary without the above capabilities can observe from the device communications. Work in this latter direction aimed, for example, at inferring the apps a user has installed on his device, or identifying the presence of a specific user within a network. In this talk, we discuss threats coming from contextual information and to which extent it is feasible, for example, to identify the specific actions that a user is doing on mobile apps, by eavesdropping their encrypted network traffic. We will also discuss the possibility of building covert and side channels leveraging timing, heat, energy consumption, and audio signals, to steal information from mobile devices, as well as inferring keypresses, password & PINs.
Bio
Mauro Conti is Full Professor at the University of Padua, Italy. He is also affiliated with TU Delft and University of Washington, Seattle. He obtained his Ph.D. from Sapienza University of Rome, Italy, in 2009. After his Ph.D., he was a Post-Doc Researcher at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In 2011 he joined as Assistant Professor the University of Padua, where he became Associate Professor in 2015, and Full Professor in 2018. He has been Visiting Researcher at GMU, UCLA, UCI, TU Darmstadt, UF, and FIU. He has been awarded with a Marie Curie Fellowship (2012) by the European Commission, and with a Fellowship by the German DAAD (2013). His research is also funded by companies, including Cisco, Intel, and Huawei. His main research interest is in the area of Security and Privacy. In this area, he published more than 400 papers in topmost international peer-reviewed journals and conferences. He is Area Editor-in-Chief for IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, and has been Associate Editor for several journals, including IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing, IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security, and IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management. He was Program Chair for TRUST 2015, ICISS 2016, WiSec 2017, ACNS 2020, and General Chair for SecureComm 2012, SACMAT 2013, CANS 2021, and ACNS 2022. He is a member of the Blockchain Expert Panel of the Italian Government. He is Senior Member of the IEEE and ACM. He is Fellow of the Young Academy of Europe.

WST5 - Shahid Raza

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Shahid Raza RISE, Stockholm Automated cybersecurity for Internet-connected Things shahid.raza@ri.se In presence
Abstract
Asymmetric cryptography has long been considered infeasible for resource-constrained devices. However, since the new IoT devices are equipped with sufficient RAM, flash, a standard 32-bit CPU and crypto hardware it is possible to bring internet-grade security to IoT. Also, the lack of a user interface and unattended deployments hinder relying on traditional methods of initial authentication using a username and a password (which also becomes the weakest link in security). Therefore, an automated security with strong digital identities that also supports Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is inevitable for IoT. A number of PKI providers offer or claim PKI solutions for IoT. However, none of them covers long-life battery-powered or energy-harvesting devices, without breaking end-to-end security. This talk will present PKI building blocks for resource-constrained IoT devices, and highlight current standardization efforts around this. It will also touch how our work facilities the implementation of the new EU Cybersecurity Act: the cybersecurity certification for IoT.
Bio
Shahid Raza is the Director of Cybersecurity at RISE where he leads a team of 20 technical security experts. He is also the founder and leader of RISE Cyber Range, a unique cybersecurity test and demo arena in Kista, Stockholm. Shahid’s primary research interest is all aspects of IoT security; only in the last two years he has received over 1500 citations on his research work on IoT security, published in prestigious journals and conferences of the area. Shahid holds a Master of Science in cybersecurity from KTH (2009) and an industrial PhD degree from Mälardalen University for this work on IoT security at RISE (2013). Shahid is also an Associate Professor in Uppsala University where he has five PhD students as the main supervisor. Shahid is also active on EU cybersecurity activities, where he represents RISE in (i) the EU Stakeholder Cybersecurity Certification Group (SCCG), (ii) the EU Cyber Security Organisation (ECSO), (iii) the EARTO Defense and Security working group, and (iv) the Management Board of H2020 CONCORDIA pilot project. He has also been a part of over 15 FP7/Horizon 2020 projects at different roles; the latest is the H2020 ARCADIAN-IoT (May 2021) where he is the technical project leader (the project review has received 15/15 scores). [www.shahidraza.net]

WST6 - Arthur van der Wees

Speaker Affiliation Talk email Mode
Arthur van der Wees Arthur's Legal B.V., Amsterdam Sense & Sensibility in Sports: Personal & Interdependent Wearables that Work vanderwees@arthurslegal.com Remote
Abstract
Finding the right symbiosis between sporter, devices and algorithms while going for Gold is not an easy feat. Making sure those are not only functioning but also can be trusted, preserve integrity and can demonstrate accountability is an even more complex one. Acknowledging that sports, sporters, devices, systems and data have many multiple interdepencencies, in (near)real-time, makes playing sport and going for Gold more challenging and full of exciting new opportunities, while raising the bar of fair play. Wearables, data and smart applications may be main enablers, as an asset, means and friend. It can however also be ones foe. Hence, we need to understand each of them, as well as the combination and interdepencies. Therefore, during this session we will start with categorizing the many wearables and other human-to-x-ables that are – or may become – available. Transparency leads to trust. To make it work, combining and balancing out both functionals and non-functionals is an essential success factor.
Bio
Arthur van der Wees is senior attorney at law, standardization and policy expert worldwide with in-depth experience of technology, consumer and other human-centric cyber-physical systems, data, trust, trustworthiness & accountability. He is managing director of Arthur's Legal, Strategies & Systems, an international strategic law firm, which for once has been supporting the Dutch olympic and sport federation at large as well as for instance the volleyball federation with data strategies, privacy and related topics. He is founding member of the Alliance for IoT Innovation (AIOTI), where he is leading the Security & Privacy in IoT Taskforces. He is (co-)author of various publications about innovation, digital transformation, data, Edge, IoT, robotics, AI, autonomous systems, security, safety and privacy and trust. He has contributed to several EU and other regulations, standards and policy instruments for the Digital Age. Furthermore he is advisory board member respectively partner in more than 14 European projects where IoT, wearables (and other Human2x-ables) and human values are generally part of, and board member of several institutes including the Institute for Accountability the Digital Age, and the New Trust Foundation. He studied and obtained his degree in computer, privacy, intellectual property rights, business law, and human rights at Leiden University.